Fiesta Saurus

Things I want to keep

Apr 16

malformalady:

A carcass of an elephant killed by poachers in a Kenyan wildlife reserve. Poaching is still rife across the region.
Photo credit: David Sheldrick/Wildlife Trust

malformalady:

A carcass of an elephant killed by poachers in a Kenyan wildlife reserve. Poaching is still rife across the region.

Photo credit: David Sheldrick/Wildlife Trust


Apr 12

blackhistoryalbum:

Fashion Flashback….New York City, 1960s.

blackhistoryalbum:

Fashion Flashback….New York City, 1960s.


malformalady:

Vegetables are seen growing on the roof of a factory in Shaoxing, eastern China’s Zhejiang Province. Ailuo garment factory planted more than 40 varieties of vegetables on its 4,800 sqm workshop roofs. The harvest is enough to produce meals for all 200 workers in the factory canteen.

malformalady:

Vegetables are seen growing on the roof of a factory in Shaoxing, eastern China’s Zhejiang Province. Ailuo garment factory planted more than 40 varieties of vegetables on its 4,800 sqm workshop roofs. The harvest is enough to produce meals for all 200 workers in the factory canteen.


Apr 9
again, was it necessary to nail this TO the tree with FOUR nails?

again, was it necessary to nail this TO the tree with FOUR nails?

(via athyriumotophorum)


Apr 4

Anonymous asked: Why would you use a pic of a gorilla in a Jane Goodall post? She's all about that chimp life, yo.

sagansense:

Referring to this post?

Although Dr. Goodall’s work focused on the study of chimpanzees, her work wouldn’t be what it is today if it weren’t for the trifecta of women advancing the frontiers of primatological research, the “Trimates”, also known as “Leakey’s Angels”, which was comprised of Jane Goodall herself, whose expertise was chimpanzees, Birutė Galdikas (sent by Louis Leakey to study orangutans), and Dian Fossey, a zoologist who studied gorillas for over 18 years. 

Dian Fossey was encouraged to go to Rwanda by anthropologist Louis Leakey to study the mountain gorilla. Tragically, Dr. Fossey was murdered at age 53 due to her powerful activism regarding her opposition to poaching and tourism, among other things due to industrialization/globalization and the impediment upon preserved habitats of wildlife in general.

The last entry in her diary read: 

"When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate more on the preservation of the future."

Her career and life were adapted into a 1988 film called ‘Gorillas In The Mist, featuring Sigourney Weaver as Fossey.

National Geographic also aired a documentary feature narrated by Sigourney Weaver, ‘The Lost Film Of Dian Fossey' in 2002 whereby never-before-seen interviews and footage of her work are brought into full view via Bob Campbell, a National Geographic photographer who worked alongside Dr. Fossey from 1968-1972, shooting over 70,000 feet of film. 

Louis Leakey (paleoanthropologist/archaeologist) was the man who established human evolutionary development in Africa (via the Olduvai Gorge, most notably), he paved the way for the creation of organizations for future research in Africa, the protection/conservation of wildlife there, and due to his ongoing efforts and value toward science communication, he was the key figure in perpetuating the continual interest in paleoanthropological research, motivating the next generations - which were comprised of the Trimates: Birutė Galdikas, Dian Fossey, and still today, Jane Goodall. 

Leakey and Goodall; 1957

If it weren’t for Louis Leakey’s efforts, who knows what would have become of these great women. Jane Goodall was pretty much taken under the wing of Louis Leakey with little field experience, where Leakey launched her career the way the H.M.S. Beagle provided the access and launchpad for Charles Darwin’s insight into the natural world and discoveries ongoing.

Read about Jane’s “Early Days”.

So yes, Goodall was all about that chimp life, but she studied primatology, to which gorillas are a part. Without her knowledge gained through observations of gorilla and chimp behavior (among other primates she encountered), her research involving comparing and contrasting various cultures and subgroups within primate societies would have been lacking key information, which Dr. Goodall was pressed for as she faced funding cuts which would have severed her ties with the wildlife community she was a member of during her involvement at Gombe, along with access to her already ongoing work in Africa. The understanding she gained from Dian Fossey’s courageous efforts and vital research is to this day, immeasurable.

Jane and Freud
Dr. Jane Goodall with Gombe chimpanzee Freud
© Michael Neugebauer

This woman is a true steward of life on this planet, and remains a revered hero for everyone, especially young women, to embody. I again encourage everyone to read all of her books, beginning with In The Shadow of Man, which provides an intimate journey throughout her young life as an aspiring scientist, the chance encounter of meeting Louis Leakey and the impression she had on him, her near-death struggles in Africa, research and development, the relationship with her (former husband) assistant/wildlife photographer, and so much more I can’t possibly describe. 

Dr. Goodall’s TED Talks What separates us from chimpanzees? and "How humans and animals can live together" are not to be missed.

When I was little, I was so in love with Jane Goodall. I wanted to be the next great primatologist. She really inspired me completely.

I wrote her a letter one day, cannot remember anything I talked about. But she wrote me back on a postcard with a chimp on the coverIt’s one of my most cherished memories.


Apr 3

Anonymous asked: Why would you use a pic of a gorilla in a Jane Goodall post? She's all about that chimp life, yo.

sagansense:

Referring to this post?

Although Dr. Goodall’s work focused on the study of chimpanzees, her work wouldn’t be what it is today if it weren’t for the trifecta of women advancing the frontiers of primatological research, the “Trimates”, also known as “Leakey’s Angels”, which was comprised of Jane Goodall herself, whose expertise was chimpanzees, Birutė Galdikas (sent by Louis Leakey to study orangutans), and Dian Fossey, a zoologist who studied gorillas for over 18 years. 

Dian Fossey was encouraged to go to Rwanda by anthropologist Louis Leakey to study the mountain gorilla. Tragically, Dr. Fossey was murdered at age 53 due to her powerful activism regarding her opposition to poaching and tourism, among other things due to industrialization/globalization and the impediment upon preserved habitats of wildlife in general.

The last entry in her diary read: 

"When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate more on the preservation of the future."

Her career and life were adapted into a 1988 film called ‘Gorillas In The Mist, featuring Sigourney Weaver as Fossey.

National Geographic also aired a documentary feature narrated by Sigourney Weaver, ‘The Lost Film Of Dian Fossey' in 2002 whereby never-before-seen interviews and footage of her work are brought into full view via Bob Campbell, a National Geographic photographer who worked alongside Dr. Fossey from 1968-1972, shooting over 70,000 feet of film. 

Louis Leakey (paleoanthropologist/archaeologist) was the man who established human evolutionary development in Africa (via the Olduvai Gorge, most notably), he paved the way for the creation of organizations for future research in Africa, the protection/conservation of wildlife there, and due to his ongoing efforts and value toward science communication, he was the key figure in perpetuating the continual interest in paleoanthropological research, motivating the next generations - which were comprised of the Trimates: Birutė Galdikas, Dian Fossey, and still today, Jane Goodall. 

Leakey and Goodall; 1957

If it weren’t for Louis Leakey’s efforts, who knows what would have become of these great women. Jane Goodall was pretty much taken under the wing of Louis Leakey with little field experience, where Leakey launched her career the way the H.M.S. Beagle provided the access and launchpad for Charles Darwin’s insight into the natural world and discoveries ongoing.

Read about Jane’s “Early Days”.

So yes, Goodall was all about that chimp life, but she studied primatology, to which gorillas are a part. Without her knowledge gained through observations of gorilla and chimp behavior (among other primates she encountered), her research involving comparing and contrasting various cultures and subgroups within primate societies would have been lacking key information, which Dr. Goodall was pressed for as she faced funding cuts which would have severed her ties with the wildlife community she was a member of during her involvement at Gombe, along with access to her already ongoing work in Africa. The understanding she gained from Dian Fossey’s courageous efforts and vital research is to this day, immeasurable.

Jane and Freud
Dr. Jane Goodall with Gombe chimpanzee Freud
© Michael Neugebauer

This woman is a true steward of life on this planet, and remains a revered hero for everyone, especially young women, to embody. I again encourage everyone to read all of her books, beginning with In The Shadow of Man, which provides an intimate journey throughout her young life as an aspiring scientist, the chance encounter of meeting Louis Leakey and the impression she had on him, her near-death struggles in Africa, research and development, the relationship with her (former husband) assistant/wildlife photographer, and so much more I can’t possibly describe. 

Dr. Goodall’s TED Talks What separates us from chimpanzees? and "How humans and animals can live together" are not to be missed.

When I was little, I was so in love with Jane Goodall. I wanted to be the next great primatologist. She really inspired me completely.

I wrote her a letter one day, cannot remember anything I talked about. But she wrote me back on a postcard with a chimp on the coverIt’s one of my most cherished memories.


Mar 31
malformalady:

Donated Blood
Photo credit: JEZ COULSON/Southern Blood Services Region

Yes, but did you know that although you donate blood out of the goodness of your heart, that organization you donate to sells that blood to a hospital. Literally sells that blood, makes money off it.It’s a business. Not a charity.http://www.forbes.com/sites/erincarlyle/2012/06/27/blood-money-the-guys-who-trade-your-blood-for-profit/

malformalady:

Donated Blood

Photo credit: JEZ COULSON/Southern Blood Services Region

Yes, but did you know that although you donate blood out of the goodness of your heart, that organization you donate to sells that blood to a hospital. Literally sells that blood, makes money off it.

It’s a business. Not a charity.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/erincarlyle/2012/06/27/blood-money-the-guys-who-trade-your-blood-for-profit/


Mar 30



Mar 23
stellarhudgens:

gyp-syqueen:

berryfathusky:

frankanthonyway:

clingy:

mercilesss:

The prisoner defiantly stares down Heinrich Himmler, Hitler’s right-hand-man, who was responsible for the Holocaust. Greasley’s confrontation with Himmler took place during an inspection of the camp he was confined to. The inmates were ordered to remain seated, but Greasley refused. Horace Greasley also escaped the death camp, but sneaked back in to rescue a German woman whom he had fallen in love with.

this is amazing

Wait it gets better, he escaped from the camp 200 times to meet with the woman he was in love with and returned after every time because there was no other place to go to. He also wrote an autobiography omfg this dude is seriously awesome

why hasnt this got more notes, seriously this guy was in a concerntration camp and all you guys reblog is fluffy chickens

I dont give a fuck what kind of blog i have this will always be in my blog and I better find on my dash again …. This should be the most famous pic on tumblr not a picture of a model… THIS !!!

This is my favourite

stellarhudgens:

gyp-syqueen:

berryfathusky:

frankanthonyway:

clingy:

mercilesss:

The prisoner defiantly stares down Heinrich Himmler, Hitler’s right-hand-man, who was responsible for the Holocaust. Greasley’s confrontation with Himmler took place during an inspection of the camp he was confined to. The inmates were ordered to remain seated, but Greasley refused. Horace Greasley also escaped the death camp, but sneaked back in to rescue a German woman whom he had fallen in love with.

this is amazing

Wait it gets better, he escaped from the camp 200 times to meet with the woman he was in love with and returned after every time because there was no other place to go to. He also wrote an autobiography omfg this dude is seriously awesome

why hasnt this got more notes, seriously this guy was in a concerntration camp and all you guys reblog is fluffy chickens

I dont give a fuck what kind of blog i have this will always be in my blog and I better find on my dash again …. This should be the most famous pic on tumblr not a picture of a model… THIS !!!

This is my favourite

(via boss-man-bing)


Mar 14
sci-universe:

Lilac Breasted Roller in flight by Joseph Mak 
Take a moment to look at all these lovely colors.

Look at what is flying around out there

sci-universe:

Lilac Breasted Roller in flight by Joseph Mak

Take a moment to look at all these lovely colors.

Look at what is flying around out there


beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies

beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies


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